The Game is afoot!

Sherlock, the new revival of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s original works, brilliantly adapted to modern-day by masterminds Steven Moffat (Tintin Adventure) and Mark Gatiss (Doctor Who). This contemporary-set, clever yet interesting Sherlock remains remarkably true to the original canon of Sherlock Holmes down to canon iconic 221B on Holmes front door on Baker Street.

In the books Holmes would use any device possible and he was always in the lab doing experiments. Sherlock Holmes and Dr. John Watson hit the new millennium with cell phones, text messages, laptops and nicotine patches in lieu of Holmes’ pipe. Dr. Watson even has a blogs for all their cases.

Benedict Cumberbatch does an outstanding job portraying Sherlock Holmes the genius “consulting detective” and self-described high-functioning sociopath who is more interested in the challenge of solving the crime than dispensing justice. While Martin Freeman plays the difficult part of Dr. John Watson, an ex-army surgeon home from Afghanistan, assistant to Sherlock and his only friend. Cumberbatch’s acting is amazing, but it falls on Freeman to be the humanizing buffer between Sherlock’s uncaring genius and the emotional real world. Both Cumberbatch and Freeman will be in The Hobbit, though the focus will be reversed.

Andrew Scott (Band of Brothers, John Adams) plays Sherlock’s nemesis, Jim Moriarty. If Sherlock is the evil genius for a better tomorrow then Moriarty is just an evil genius. The dark opposite to Sherlock, he is a self-styled “consulting criminal” who aids, but rarely is involved directly with the cases. Scott plays Moriarty as a complete psychopath in all its glory. He represents what Holmes might be without his Scooby gang to support and ground him. The closest rivalry between this Sherlock and Moriarty would probably be that of Batman and The Joker. Two sides of the same coin with only a single rule separating one from the other.

Sherlock has already aired two series. Each series consists of three 90 minute episodes that tell three complete, but linked stories. Moffat and Gatiss announced on Twitter that a third series had been commissioned at the same time as the second series was. The third series should air in the UK in 2013.

Sherlock is a well written and superbly acted show that is very focused. Each season is like a trilogy of movies that actually feel like movies. But why the title, “The Future Of TV Shows?” These days TV shows seem to be commissioned 6 episodes at a time. After taking away time for commercials those six episodes amount to the same time as Sherlock’s three movies. Maybe it would be better for dramas to be commissioned on mini seasons with complete story arcs that have ends, but can be continued indefinitely. The network doesn’t have to commit to 20 episodes and viewers get complete stories even if the show is cancelled or goes on extended hiatus.

But in the reality of the present Jonny Lee Miller (Dexter, Hackers) will take on a modern-day Sherlock Holmes in NYC in a new show titled “Elementary”. Miller and Cumberbatch recently alternated playing the mad doctor in Frankenstein on the London stage. While we adore Johnny, it just won’t have the same punch that Sherlock has because each episode with be 42 minutes, interrupted by commercials and can’t tackle canon tales in a single night.

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The Game is afoot! Sherlock, the new revival of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s original works, brilliantly adapted to modern-day by masterminds Steven Moffat (Tintin Adventure) and Mark Gatiss (Doctor Who). This contemporary-set, clever yet interesting Sherlock remains remarkably true to the original canon of Sherlock Holmes down to canon iconic...